June 15, 2024
Agriculture is the backbone of Burundi’s economy and is the primary livelihood for 90 per cent of the country’s population. However, the sector is characterized by over exploitation and degradation of land, significant post-harvest losses, unequal access to land, disease outbreaks, poor agricultural practices, and limited access to inputs and markets. The continuous impacts from climate change and the recent COVID19 pandemic has increased the number of people going to bed hungry.

By Irene Gaitirira
Published March 29, 2023

Agriculture is the backbone of Burundi’s economy and is the primary livelihood for 90 per cent of the country’s population. However, the sector is characterized by over exploitation and degradation of land, significant post-harvest losses, unequal access to land, disease outbreaks, poor agricultural practices, and limited access to inputs and markets. The continuous impacts from climate change and the recent COVID19 pandemic has increased the number of people going to bed hungry.International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and Burundi’s Ministry of Finance, Budget and Economic Planning have signed a US$3 million grant to help mitigate the ongoing impacts of the crisis occasioned by Russia-Ukraine conflict.

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Agriculture is the backbone of Burundi’s economy and is the primary livelihood for 90 per cent of the country’s population. However, the sector is characterized by over exploitation and degradation of land, significant post-harvest losses, unequal access to land, disease outbreaks, poor agricultural practices, and limited access to inputs and markets. The continuous impacts from climate change and the recent COVID19 pandemic has increased the number of people going to bed hungry.

With the inflationary effects the Ukraine crisis has had on food and fertilizer prices the situation has become dire, putting these commodities out of reach for Burundi and many other countries that import them.

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“IFAD has supported Burundi for more than 40 years, helping the country build the agriculture sector and resilience of small-scale farmers who are the most affected by these crises. To be successful, IFAD continuously adapts its investments to meet the needs of Member states. With the shocks Burundi is currently facing, the grant funded by CRI offers crucial support to small-scale farmers to help them cope with the imminent challenges,” says Dagmawi Habte-Selassie, IFAD Country Director for Burundi.

The funds will be disbursed through the Agricultural Production Intensification and Vulnerability Reduction Project (PIPARV-B) to help 255,480 poor rural people protect their livelihoods and safeguard their food security. Small-scale farmers in Gitega, Karusi, Kayanza, Ngozi and Muyinga will receive hybrid maize seeds, climate resilient vegetable seeds, mushroom and pig kits.

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